Home » Owning a Home

Category: Owning a Home

3 Tips for Making Your Dream of Buying a Home Come True

Is your goal for 2017 to buy a home of your own? Realtor.com recently shared ‘5 Habits to Start Now If You Hope to Buy a Home in 2017’ … below are the top 3:

#1 Automate Your Down Payment Savings

Saving for a down payment is often one of the biggest barriers to homeownership cited in survey after survey. One way to jump start your savings is to automate your checking account to automatically save a small amount of your paycheck into a separate savings account or ‘house fund’.

“Amassing enough for a down payment takes discipline & perseverance, but setting up automatic savings can make it easier. If you never see the cash, you won’t spend it.”

#2 Build Your Credit History & Keep It Clean

When you go to apply for a mortgage, lenders will want to see that you have been able to pay off past debts. This means staying on top of your student loans, credit cards and car loans and paying them on time!

Credit bureaus recommend using no more than 30% of the credit available to you.

 

#3 Practice Living on a Budget

Downsizing your spending now will allow you to save more for your down payment & pay down other debts to improve your credit score. A recent study showed that “95% of first-time buyers were willing to make sacrifices to buy their home faster.” (below are the top 3 sacrifices made)

 

Some Highlights:

  • Realtor.com recently shared “5 Habits to Start Now If You Hope to Buy a Home in 2017.”
  • Setting up an automatic savings plan that saves a small amount of every check is one of the best ways to save without thinking a lot about it.
  • Living within a budget now will help you save money for down payments and pay down other debts that might be holding you back.

#carlspiteriteam #benchmarkmortgagecarlspiteri #CAlender #mortgage #BenchmarkMortgageCarlSpiteri #weloveourclients #SDlender #soCalLender #homeloans #sdhomes #lendersandiego #homemortgage #loans #sandiegohomes #smarthomebuyerworkshop #prepp #sold #loveourclients #WantToMove
#BuyMyHouse #RealEstate #NewHome #HouseHunting #HomesForSale
#Investment #Mortgage #Realtor

https://goo.gl/xR6PWh

Homeowner’s Net Worth Is 45x Greater Than A Renter’s

Federal Reserve reports that a homeowner’s net worth is 36 times greater than that of a renter ($194,500 vs. $5,400). 

Every three years, the Federal Reserve conducts a Survey of Consumer Finances in which they collect data across all economic and social groups. The latest survey, which includes data from 2010-2013, reports that a homeowner’s net worth is 36 times greater than that of a renter ($194,500 vs. $5,400).

 

In a Forbes article, the National Association of Realtors’ (NAR) Chief Economist Lawrence Yun predicts that by the end of 2016, the net worth gap will widen even further to 45 times greater.

The graph above demonstrates the results of the last two Federal Reserve studies and Yun’s prediction.

Put Your Housing Cost to Work for You

As we’ve said before, simply put, homeownership is a form of ‘forced savings.’ Every time you pay your mortgage, you are contributing to your net worth. Every time you pay your rent, you are contributing to your landlord’s net worth.

The latest National Housing Pulse Survey from NAR reveals that 85% of consumers believe that purchasing a home is a good financial decision. Yun comments:

“Though there will always be discussion about whether to buy or rent, or whether the stock market offers a bigger return than real estate, the reality is that homeowners steadily build wealth. The simplest math shouldn’t be overlooked.”

Bottom Line

If you are interested in finding out if you could put your housing cost to work for you by purchasing a home, let’s get together and evaluate your ability to buy today!

Call Me for more info:  Carl at 619-544-6444

#carlspiteriteam #benchmarkmortgagecarlspiteri #CAlender #mortgage #BenchmarkMortgageCarlSpiteri #weloveourclients #SDlender #soCalLender #homeloans #sdhomes #lendersandiego #homemortgage #loans #sandiegohomes #smarthomebuyerworkshop #prepp #sold #loveourclients #WantToMove
#BuyMyHouse #RealEstate #NewHome #HouseHunting #HomesForSale
#Investment #Mortgage #Realtor #FridayFacts

Original Article

Demand for your homes is very strong right now while the competition is at a historically low level.

As we are about to bring in the New Year, families across the country will be deciding if this is the year that they will sell their current house and move into their dream home. Many will decide that it is smarter to wait until the spring “buyer’s market” to list their house. In the past, that might have made sense. However, this winter is not like recent years.

The recent jump in mortgage rates has forced buyers off the fence and into the market, resulting in incredibly strong demand RIGHT NOW!! At the same time, inventory levels of homes for sale have dropped dramatically as compared to this time last year.

Chart above showing the decrease in inventory levels by category.

Demand for your home is very strong right now while your competition (other homes for sale) is at a historically low level. If you are thinking of selling in 2017, now may be the time.

#carlspiteriteam #benchmarkmortgagecarlspiteri #CAlender #mortgage #BenchmarkMortgageCarlSpiteri #weloveourclients #SDlender #soCalLender #homeloans #sdhomes #lendersandiego #homemortgage #loans #sandiegohomes #smarthomebuyerworkshop #prepp #sold #loveourclients #WantToMove
#BuyMyHouse #RealEstate #NewHome #HouseHunting #HomesForSale
#Investment #Mortgage #Realtor

Article: https://goo.gl/1ocaYi

Does Student Loans = Higher Credit Scores?

According to a recent analysis by CoreLogic, Millennial renters (aged 20-34) who have student loan debt also have higher credit scores than those who do not have student loans.

This may come as a surprise, as there is so much talk about student loans burdening Millennials and holding them back from many milestones that previous generations have been able to achieve (i.e. homeownership, investing for retirement). Complete Mortgage application Now!

CoreLogic used the information provided on rental applications and the applicants’ credit history from credit bureaus to determine if there was a correlation between student loan debt and credit scores.

The analysis concluded that:

“Student loan debt did not prevent millennials from access to credit even though it may delay their homebuying decisions.”

In fact, those with a higher amount of debt actually had higher credit scores. More Questions, Register now for SmartHomeBuyerWorkshop.

“Renters with student loan debt have higher average credit scores than those without; and those with higher debt amounts have higher average credit scores than those with lower student loan debt amounts.”

Bottom Line

Millennials are on pace to become the most educated generation in our nation’s history, with that comes a pretty big bill for education. But there is a light at the end of the tunnel:

“Despite the fact that student loan debt has grown into the nation’s second largest consumer debt, following mortgage, and has created a significant financial burden for millennials, it does not appear to prevent millennials from accessing credit.”

Article From Keeping Current Matters

3 Questions Every Buyer Should Ask Themselves

If you are debating purchasing a home right now, you are probably getting a lot of advice. Though your friends and family will have your best interest at heart, they may not be fully aware of your needs and what is currently happening in the real estate market.

Answering the following 3 questions will help you determine if now is actually a good time for you to buy in today’s market.

1. Why am I buying a home in the first place?

This truly is the most important question to answer. Forget the finances for a minute. Why did you even begin to consider purchasing a home? For most, the reason has nothing to do with money.

For example, a recent survey by Braun showed that over 75% of parents say “their child’s education is an important part of the search for a new home.”

This survey supports a study by the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University which revealed that the four major reasons why people buy a home have nothing to do with money. They are:

  • A good place to raise children and for them to get a good education
  • A place where you and your family feel safe
  • More space for you and your family
  • Control of that space

What does owning a home mean to you? What non-financial benefits will you and your family gain from owning a home? The answer to that question should be the biggest reason you decide to purchase or not.

2. Where are home values headed?

According to the latest Home Price Index from CoreLogic, home values are projected to increase by 5.3% over the next 12 months.

What does that mean to you?

Simply put, if you are planning on buying a home that costs $250,000 today, that same home will cost you an additional $13,250 if you wait till next year. Your down payment will need to be higher as well to account for the higher home price.

3. Where are mortgage interest rates headed?

A buyer must be concerned about more than just prices. The ‘long term cost’ of a home can be dramatically impacted by even a small increase in mortgage rates. 

The Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA), the National Association of Realtors, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have all projected that mortgage interest rates will increase over the next twelve months as you can see in the chart below:

3-questions-buyers-need-to-ask2

Bottom Line

Only you and your family will know for certain if now is the right time to purchase a home. Answering these questions will help you make that decision.

Source

 

The Top Reasons Why Americans Buy Homes

Reasons-Why-Americans-Buy-Homes_1

 

Last week, the inaugural “Homebuyer Insights Report” was released by the Bank of America. The report revealed the reasons why consumers purchase homes and what their feelings are regarding homeownership.

Consumer Lending Executive, D. Steve Boland, explained:

“Homebuyers today are motivated by both emotional and practical reasons. Nearly all want more space, but a majority of homebuyers, especially those purchasing their first home, are also looking for a place to call their own, put down roots and make memories. They value the emotional benefits of owning a home as much as the financial ones.”

Boland went on to say:

“The path to homeownership is a journey and can be as overwhelming as it is exciting. For many people, this is the single most significant financial transaction they will ever make.”

This was evidenced in the report when they asked today’s homebuyers to define homeownership. Their answers tell the whole story.

 

Reasons-Why-Americans-Buy-Homes_3

Bottom Line

Homeownership has always been a part of the American Dream and survey after survey confirms this will always be the case.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Article

Buying a Home is 36% Less Expensive Than Renting Nationwide!

In the latest Rent vs. Buy Report from Trulia, they explained that homeownership remains cheaper than renting with a traditional 30-year fixed rate mortgage in the 100 largest metro areas in the United States.

The updated numbers actually show that the range is an average of 5% less expensive in Orange County (CA) all the way up to 46% in Houston (TX), and 36% Nationwide!

Other interesting findings in the report include:

  • Interest rates have remained low and even though home prices have appreciated around the country, they haven’t greatly outpaced rental appreciation.
  • Some markets may tip in favor of renting if home prices increase at a greater rate than rents and if – as most economists expect – mortgage rates rise, due to the strengthening economy.
  • Nationally, rates would have to rise to 10.6% for renting to be cheaper than buying – and rates haven’t been that high since 1989.

 

Bottom Line

Buying a home makes sense socially and financially. If you are one of the many renters out there who would like to evaluate your ability to buy this year, meet with a local real estate professional who can help you find your dream home.

Article

Over Half of Americans Planning on Buying in the Next 5 Years

According to the BMO Harris Bank Home Buying Report, 52% of Americans say they are likely to buy a home in the next five years. Americans surveyed for the report said that they would be willing to pay an average of $296,000 for a home and would average a 21% down payment. The report also included other interesting revelations.

Those Looking to Buy

  • 74% of those looking to buy a new home will consult with a real estate agent
  • 59% said they will visit online real estate websites
  • 37% will seek recommendations from friends and family
  • 78% plan to get pre-approved before seriously searching for a home

 Those Who Already Own

  • 75% of current homeowners set a budget before looking for a home, and 16% ended up spending less while 13% went over their budget.
  • 63% of American homeowners spent under six months looking for a new home before they made a purchase.
  • 8% bought their home without participating in an active real estate search – or even any plan to buy at all – because a specific property caught their attention.

The last point is very interesting: Of those who purchased a home, 8% bought “without any plan to buy at all”. A property caught their attention and they acted on it.

Why Are More People Not Planning Their Next Move?

Why are people that are considering a move not putting their home search to a plan, and instead, buying only when a property catches their attention? An article by Fannie Maereveals evidence that a large number of homeowners are dramatically underestimating the equity they have in their current home. The report explains that:

“Homeowners may be underestimating their home equity. In particular, if homeowners believe that large down payments are now required to purchase a home, then widespread, large underestimates of their home equity could be deterring them from applying for mortgages, selling their homes, and buying different homes.”

Bottom Line

Perhaps it is time to sit with a real estate professional to determine the actual equity you have in your house and to take a look at the opportunities that currently exist in the real estate market. This may be the perfect time to move-up, move-down or buy that vacation home your family has always wanted.

 

Article

You Can Save for a Down Payment Faster Than You Think

In a study conducted by Builder.com, researchers determined that nationwide, it would take “nearly eight years” for a first-time buyer to save enough for a down payment on their dream home.

Depending on where you live, median rents, incomes and home prices all vary. By determining the percentage of income a renter spends on housing in each state, and the amount needed for a 10% down payment, they were able to establish how long (in years) it would take for an average resident to save.

According to the study, residents in South Dakota are able to save for a down payment the quickest in just under 3.5 years. Below is a map created using the data for each state:

Years-To-Save-10-2016

What if you only needed to save 3%?

What if you were able to take advantage of one of the Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae 3% down programs? Suddenly saving for a down payment no longer takes 5 or 10 years, but becomes attainable in under two years in many states as shown in the map below.

Years-To-Save-3-KCM-2016

 

Bottom Line

Whether you have just started to save for a down payment, or have been for years, you may be closer to your dream home than you think! Meet with a local real estate professional who can help you evaluate your ability to buy today.

Article

 

The Four C’s of Borrowing

A well-made table has four solid legs, and a well-made borrower is aware of the four C’s of borrowing: character, capacity, collateral and credit. These are the four legs you bring to the table for borrowing. What does each of these legs mean and how does each one keep your table up?

Character

Character is your work and income history. Every borrower needs to show the ability to repay the loan. Have you been regularly employed for at least two years? Banks wants to see that you have a regular income so you can make your loan payments. If you are a job hopper or your income is sporadic because your line of work is seasonal, you may be viewed as a risk. While child support and alimony can be viewed as income, it must be verified and continued for at least three years. If you’re self-employed and own your business, banks want to calculate the average of your monthly net income over two years. Payments of income such as commissions, bonuses and overtime also need to be averaged over two years. By averaging everything over those 24 months, banks can get a better gauge of your ability to repay that loan.

Capacity

Capacity is what you can afford. Are you already leveraged to the hilt? The rule of thumb is that your housing costs (mortgage, taxes, insurance and HOA) should be no more than 38 percent of your monthly income. But after adding in the rest of what you owe, your total ratio of debt to income (DTI) should be no more than 43 percent of your monthly income. If your DTI ratio is higher, your debt load is too heavy and the banks fear you can’t carry that weight, but may make exceptions depending on the overall scenario.

Collateral

Collateral is the house. It is what the lender uses to make sure that if you don’t pay back the money loaned to you, there is something there to help the lender get the money back. This is done through a process called foreclosure, in which you give the home back to the lender in exchange for the balance you owe on the home (not a good idea and will negatively affect your credit). That is the reason most lenders require money down and if you do not put 20 percent down your lender will likely require mortgage insurance. This insurance protects the lender and not the borrower. Banks want you to have enough for a down payment and closing costs. If the bank covers those costs, it usually will be in exchange for a higher interest rate.

Credit

Credit is your payment history, and is undoubtedly the most important C. Banks know that if you regularly paid your debts in the past, you most likely will continue to pay your debts. To establish credit, you should have at least two years of debt payments and four accounts reporting your credit. How is your credit scored (analyzed)? The higher your score, the better your credit is, and the easier it is to get a loan and a favorable interest rate. Did you make any late payments in the past two years? Do you have any judgment, liens, bankruptcies or loan modifications? Any of those negative actions will bring down your credit score. The lower your credit score, the less likely you will qualify.